This website uses cookies to provide a rich user experience. Please consult our Cookie Policy to learn about what cookies this website uses, or to control the cookies you receive. You need do nothing if you are happy to receive cookies.
Look and Learn History Picture Library License images from £2.99 Pay by PayPal for images for immediate download Member of British Association of Picture Libraries and Agencies (BAPLA)

Archive for September, 2010

All of these articles and images are available for licensing: click on an image to see further details and licensing options; contact us about licensing textual content.

Birth of Thor Heyerdahl

Posted in Anniversary, Exploration on Saturday, 25 September 2010

picture, Thor Heyerdahl, Kon-Tiki

Thor Heyerdahl’s famous vessel, the Kon-Tiki

6 October marks the anniversary of the birth of Thor Heyerdahl in 1914. Born in Larvik, the Norwegian explorer became famous as an adventurer when he sailed 4,300 miles on a raft, the Kon-Tiki, from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The 101-day voyage was not his last: he later used boats made of papyrus and reeds to sail the Atlantic (Ra II) and another reed boat (Tigris) in which he sailed around the waters of the Middle East before burning the boat as a protest against wars that were being fought in the region.

picture, portrait, Thor Heyerdahl

A portrait of Thor Heyerdahl

Heyerdahl died in 2002, aged 87.

More pictures relating to Thor Heyerdahl can be found here. Many more illustrations relating to voyages by sea can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The first “talkie”

Posted in Anniversary, History, Music, Technology on Saturday, 25 September 2010

picture, Al Jolson, The Jazz Singer

Al Jolson in The Jazz Singer

6 October marks the anniversary of the release of The Jazz Singer, the first movie to be released with synchronized dialogue sequences in 1927. The movie starred Al Jolson, a talented jazz singer, who performs six songs during the film.

Jolson was not the first choice for the leading role, despite the fact that the story was based on his life, via a short story entitled “The Day of Atonement” by Samson Raphaelson, who had seen Jolson perform in 1917. The story, published in 1922, was adapted by Raphaelson as a stage play starring George Jessel in 1925. Negotiations with Jessel to star in the film broke down and Jolson was invited to play the part.

Many more pictures relating to films and film stars can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The first fatality of a dogfight

Posted in Anniversary, Aviation, World War 1 on Friday, 24 September 2010

picture, biplane, aerial combat, dogfight

A dogfight between British and German biplanes. Illustration by Wilf Hardy

5 October marks the anniversary of the first aerial dogfight that resulted in a kill in 1914. Prior to this, British and German aircraft had been used solely for observation and pilots crossing paths would often wave to each other. As the war became more bitterly fought, pilots began throwing objects or firing revolvers.

Aerial combat quickly developed, first with mounted machine guns and then a system which allowed pilots to shoot through the propeller along its flight path.

More pictures of aerial dogfights can be found here. Many more illustrations of aircraft of the Great War can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The end of R101

Posted in Anniversary, Aviation, History on Friday, 24 September 2010

picture, R101, airship, crash

The end of R101. Illustration by Graham Coton

5 October marks the anniversary of the destruction of the British airship R101 on its maiden voyage in 1930. The rigid airship was completed in 1929 and after test flights, it set out on its maiden voyage to Karachi, India, from Cardington, Bedfordshire, at 6.24 p.m. with 12 passengers.

The flight was erratic from the start and,over France, the airship nosedived into the ground, where she burst into flames, killing 47 immediately. A 48th victim died in hospital 3 days later.

The disaster effectively ended the idea of rigid airships being used for public transport in the UK.

More pictures of airships can be found here. Many more illustrations relating to aircraft and flight through the ages can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

A first for space travel

Posted in Anniversary, History, Space, Technology on Thursday, 23 September 2010

picture, satellite

A step into space: satellites paved the way to man’s first trip to the Moon

4 October marks the anniversary of an important step in the development of space travel. In 1957, Sputnik 1 was launched from a launch site, known as Site No. 1, near Tyuratam in the republic of Kazakh SSR (now Kazakhstan). The 23-inch-wide ball transmitted a signal for 22 days until its batteries ran out and circled the Earth until 4 January 1958 when it reentered Earth’s atmosphere and burned up.

Many more pictures relating to space and space travel can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The first public escalator

Posted in Anniversary, Technology on Thursday, 23 September 2010

picture, The moving stairway, elevator

Inside a moving stairway

4 October marks the anniversary of the opening of the first public escalator at Earls Court underground station in 1911. The idea for a moving stairway was not new: a patent was granted for a system as early as 1859. The idea did not catch on until the 1890s when Jesse Wilford Reno installed an ‘inclined elevator’ at Coney Island, New York.

In the UK, the first moving staircase was installed at Harrods in Knightsbridge in 1898, and unnerved customers  to the department store were met by employees of the shop dispensing free smelling salts and cognac to help them over the experience.

More pictures of escalators can be found here. Many more illustrations featuring the more common and less mobile form of staircase can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Death of Sir Malcolm Sargent

Posted in Anniversary, Music on Wednesday, 22 September 2010

picture, Sir Malcolm Sargent

Sir Malcolm Sargent

3 October marks the anniversary of the death of Sir Malcolm Sargent in 1967. He was born in Ashford, Kent, on 29 April 1895, the son of a coal merchant who was also an amateur musician. Sargent trained at the Royal College of Organists and was awarded a degree at the University of Durham.

In the 1920s he rose to fame as a conductor and was knighted for his services to music in 1947. He was the chief conductor of the Proms from 1948 until his death.

More pictures of music and musicians throughout the ages can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The mystery of Edgar Allan Poe

Posted in Anniversary, Literature, Mystery on Wednesday, 22 September 2010

picture, Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe at work. Illustration by Chas. Sheldon

3 October marks the anniversary of the last public sighting of author Edgar Allan Poe in 1849. Poe was found in a delirious state on the streets of Baltimore, Maryland, “in great distress, and … in need of immediate assistance”, according to Joseph W. Walker, who found him. How Poe, by then one of the most famous writers in America, came to be in such a position – and wearing somebody else’s clothing – will never be known. He was taken to Washington College Hospital where he died four days later, aged only 40, never coherent enough to explain how he came to be in his condition.

More pictures relating to Edgar Allan Poe can be found here. Many more illustrations relating to authors and their works can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The birth of television

Posted in Anniversary, Science, Technology on Tuesday, 21 September 2010

picture, John Logie Baird and his early television system

John Logie Baird and his early television system. Illustration by John Keay

2 October marks the anniversary of John Logie Baird’s first test of a working television system in 1925. Baird had already demonstrated a semi-mechanical analogue television system to the Radio Times in 1924 which could transmit silhouette images, and performed demonstrations at Selfridges department store in March and April 1925. But it was in October that he successfully transmitted the first television picture with a greyscale image, using first a ventriloquist’s dummy, then a local office worker, William Edward Taynton – the first person ever to appear on television.

Many more pictures about science through the ages can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Birth of Graham Greene

Posted in Anniversary, Literature on Tuesday, 21 September 2010

picture, A Guide to the works of Graham Greene

A Guide to the works of Graham Greene

2 October marks the anniversary of Graham Greene in 1904. Born Henry Graham Greene in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, he was educated at Balliol College, Oxford, where he wrote his first volume of poetry. After graduating he worked as a journalist on the Nottingham Journal and began writing novels. His first, The Man Within (1929), was well received and was followed by a further 27, as well as many books of autobiography, essays, travel and criticism, children’s books, plays and screenplays.

His most widely known works are the novels Stamboul Train, England Made Me, A Gun for Sale, Brighton Rock, The Confidential Agent, The Power and the Glory, The Ministry of Fear, The Heart of the Matter, The Third Man, The End of the Affair and The Quiet American.

picture, Brighton Rock by Graham Greene

Brighton Rock by Graham Greene. Illustration by Graham Byfield

Many more pictures relating to authors and their works can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.