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Archive for July, 2010

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Birth of Neil Armstrong

Posted in Aerospace, Anniversary, Space on Monday, 26 July 2010

picture, portrait Neil Armstrong, Apollow astronaut

Neil Armstrong, Apollo astronaut and first man on the Moon. Illustration by Wilf Hardy

5 August is the anniversary of the birth of astronaut Neil Armstrong. Born in Wapakoneta, Ohio, in 1930, he studied aerospace engineering and spent some years with the Fleet Aircraft Service of the American Navy. After working as a test pilot, he joined what was then the US Air Force’s space programme.

Armstrong was the commander of Apollo 11 and, on 21 July 1969, became the first man to set foot on the Moon.

picture, Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11, Moon landing

Neil Armstrong, the first man to set foot on the Moon. Illustration by Wilf Hardy

More pictures relating to the Apollo space programme can be found here. Many more pictures relating to space and space exploration can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

First voyage of the Mayflower

Posted in Anniversary, History, Religion on Monday, 26 July 2010

picture, Pilgrim Fathers, Mayflower, Plymouth

The Pilgrim Fathers aboard the Mayflower leave Plymouth for America. Illustration by Ron Embleton

5 August marks the anniversary of the launch of the Mayflower and Speedwell on their first attempt to sail to America in 1620. The two ships were meant to transport English Separatists fleeing the volatile political situation in England to the virtually unsettled new lands, where they became known as the Pilgrim Fathers.

The Speedwell developed a leak and the first attempt ended when it returned to Dartmouth to be refitted. A second attempt reached the Atlantic, but once again the Speedwell had to return due to a leak. The Mayflower had to sail alone, eventually settling in what became known as  Plymouth, Massachusetts.

More pictures relating to the Pilgrim Fathers can be found here. Many more images relating to America and its history can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Britain declares war on Germany

Posted in Anniversary, Famous battles, World War 1 on Sunday, 25 July 2010

picture, Battle of the Somme, World War I

The Battle of the Somme, one of the bloodiest conflicts of the Great War. Illustration by James E. McConnell

4 August marks the anniversary of the invasion of Belgium by Germany in 1914. In response, the United Kingdom declared war on Germany. On the same day, the United States declared its neutrality.

The First World War (Great War) came to an end in late 1918, although conflicts were fought in eastern Europe until 1922. More than 15 million were killed during the war.

Many more pictures relating to World War I can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Founding of the British Red Cross

Posted in Anniversary, Famous battles, Medicine on Sunday, 25 July 2010

picture, Prisoners of war receiving their Red Cross parcels

Prisoners of war receiving their Red Cross parcels. Illustration by Angus McBride

4 August marks the anniversary of the founding of the British Red Cross Society for the Sick and Wounded in War in 1870. The international movement had been founded seven years earlier in Switzerland and had swept across Europe, with the British Red Cross formed by Lord Wantage after a public meeting.

The Red Cross has aided those in need of help during wars and disasters ever since.

More pictures relating to the Red Cross can be found here. A wider variety of illustrations relating to charity and charitable organisations can also be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Birth of Rupert Brooke

Posted in Anniversary, Famous battles, Literature on Saturday, 24 July 2010

picture, World War One, trenches, Rupert Brooke, soldier

Rupert Brooke’s The Soldier deals with the death and accomplishments of a soldier during WWI. Illustration by Andrew Howat

3 August marks the anniversary of the birth of Rupert Brooke in 1887. Born in Rugby, Warwickshire, Brooke attended King’s College, Cambridge, and had friends amongst the Bloomsbury group of writers including Virginia Woolf.

Brooke joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve in 1914 and was part of the expeditionary forces in the Mediterranean. He was bitten by a mosquito, developed sepsis and died on 23 April 1915.

His book, 1914 and Other Poems was published in May 1915 and was a best-seller. It included Brooke’s poem “The Soldier”, which contains the famous lines: “If I should die, think only this of me: / That there’s some corner of a foreign field / That is forever England.”

More picture relating to Brooke can be found here. A much wider variety of illustrations relating to the Great War can also be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Death of Joseph Conrad

Posted in Anniversary, Literature on Saturday, 24 July 2010

picture, A scene from The Rover by Joseph Conrad

A scene from The Rover by Joseph Conrad. Illustration by John Millar Watt

3 August marks the anniversary of the death of novelist Joseph Conrad in 1924. Born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski in Poland in 1857, he travelled widely before arriving in England in 1878 where he worked as a sailor.

His first novel was published in 1895 and many more followed, including Lord Jim (1900), Heart of Darkness (1902), Nostromo (1904), The Secret Agent (1907) and The Rover (1923).

Many more pictures relating to authors and their works can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Inventing the telephone

Posted in Anniversary, Communications, Science on Friday, 23 July 2010

picture, Alexander Graham Bell and his invention, the telephone

Alexander Graham Bell’s experiments culminated in the invention of the telephone

2 August marks the anniversary of the death of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, in 1922. Bell developed the first practical telephone for which he was issued a US patent in 1876.

By coincidence, it is also the anniversary of the birth of Elisha Gray, who developed a telephone prototype in 1876 and is considered by some to be the true inventor of the telephone.

More pictures of telephones can be found here. A wider variety of images relating to the history of communication can also be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The Transatlantic Cable

Posted in Anniversary, Communications, Technology on Friday, 23 July 2010

picture, The Great Eastern

The Great Eastern, the biggest passenger ship in the world in its day, later converted for cable laying. Illustration by John S. Smith

2 August marks the anniversary of an unsuccessful laying of the first transatlantic telegraph cable. Three attempts were made at laying a telegraphic cable across the Atlantic, one in 1857 and two in 1858, before the first attempt was made by the Great Eastern, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. The converted passenger ship tried twice, but on its first attempt, on this day in 1865, the cable broke.

A second attempt from the same ship was successful and the first cable was subsequently repaired. The first message was sent on 16 August 1866.

More pictures featuring the Great Eastern can be found here. Many more illustrations relating to ships and maritime history can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Battle of the Nile

Posted in Anniversary, Famous battles, History on Thursday, 22 July 2010

picture, Nelson, Battle of the Nile

Lord Horatio Nelson at the Battle of the Nile. Illustration by Ron Embleton

1 August marks the anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of the Nile in 1759. The three-day battle between the British and French fleets occurred off the coast of Egypt at Aboukir Bay. The French fleet, under Vice-Admiral Francois-Paul Brueys D’Aigalliers, was unable to hold a defensive line and the British fleet, under Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, were able to slip behind them, trapping many of the French ships in crossfire and resulting in a resounding victory for Nelson.

More picture relating to the Battle of the Nile can be found here. A wider selection of illustrations featuring Lord Nelson is also available at the Look and Learn picture library.

The Slavery Abolition Act comes into force

Posted in Anniversary, History, Law on Thursday, 22 July 2010

picture, slave trade, raiders, Africa

A raiding party gathers slaves from an African village. Illustration by James E. McConnell

1 August marks the anniversary of the enactment of the Slavory Abolition Act in 1834. It outlawed slavery across the British Empire except for certain territories (notably those under the control of the East India Company).

The slave trade had been outlawed in Britain since 1807 and the Slave Trade Act. In practice it did not stop the trade. Nor did the Slavery Abolition Act end slavery; slaves were redesignated apprentices and owners were allowed up to six years before full emancipation was required by law.

More pictures relating to the history of slaves and the slave trade can be found here. Many more illustrations by James E. McConnell are available at the Look and Learn picture library.