This website uses cookies to provide a rich user experience. Please consult our Cookie Policy to learn about what cookies this website uses, or to control the cookies you receive. You need do nothing if you are happy to receive cookies.
Look and Learn History Picture Library License images from £2.99 Pay by PayPal for images for immediate download Member of British Association of Picture Libraries and Agencies (BAPLA)

Archive for May, 2007

All of these articles and images are available for licensing: click on an image to see further details and licensing options; contact us about licensing textual content.

The Tower of Babel

Posted in Bible on Saturday, 26 May 2007

Tower of Babel (illustration, picture: James E McConnell)

This is one of the fabulous illustrations that appeared in The Bible Story, a short-lived companion publication to Look and Learn. The artist is James E McConnell.

Elephant keeper

Posted in Britain in the 60s on Saturday, 26 May 2007

Elephant keeper (illustration, picture)

This is from the series ‘People You See’ which appeared in Teddy Bear magazine in the early 1960s.

Angus McBride (1931-2007)

Posted in Art, Illustrators on Saturday, 26 May 2007

James Bruce African Explorer (illustration Angus McBride)

Angus McBride, who died on 15 May, only a matter of days after celebrating his 76th birthday, was one of Britain’s finest military illustrators, his work appearing in over 150 books ranging from The Zulu War to Warriors of Medieval Japan. Martin Windrow, who edited many of the books McBride illustrated, has said, “Angus is known for his brilliant use of colour, for his mastery of direct and reflected light effects, and for his command of the viewer’s eye, which is directed exactly where he wants it to fall, as soon as the page is turned.”

In the past, military history books had demanded accurate depictions of uniforms but allowed them to be hung on people that looked like tailor’s dummies; McBride and his contemporaries—amongst them Ron Embleton, Gerry Embleton and Richard Hook—breathed life into their subjects. “He could make them look like living people,” says William Shepherd of Osprey Publishing. “It was that and the filling in of detail that made his work so exciting.”

Read the rest of this article »

The plant that protected a Goddess

Posted in Legend, Nature on Friday, 25 May 2007

Asparagus and Perigyne (illustration: Paul Rainer)

Asparagus, like garlic, belongs to the lily family, and has been cultivated as a food for over 2,000 years. The Romans grew it as high as 20 feet, and they have left records of stems being cooked and eaten that weighed as much as three pounds. They must have been served half raw, as a favourite expression those days was to do things ‘as quickly as asparagus is cooked’. The Romans used the berries too, fermenting them and making them into a drink.

There is a rather pretty story about the asparagus plant that is still told in Greece. Perigyne, a character in Grecian mythology, had fled into an asparagus thicket, after her father had been killed. “If you will hide me from my enemies,” she begged, “I will never destroy or burn you.” The asparagus heard her plea and concealed her well. Because of this, it is said, the Ionians, who claim to be descended from Perigyne, will never permit the asparagus plant to be destroyed.

Read the rest of this article »

In search of El Dorado

Posted in Adventure, Exploration, Geography, History on Thursday, 24 May 2007

El Dorado (illustration)

Around Lake Guatavita, two miles up in the Colombian Andes, thousands of Indians were gathering to hail their new chief. Huge bonfires burned on the hills overlooking the lake, as the chief, surrounded by nobles and priests, was borne on a litter hung with golden discs to its shore.

The chief’s body had been anointed with resin and then covered all over with gold dust. He walked towards the lake, then, as the fires blazed up to the sky, and the vast throng threw gold and emeralds and other offerings into the lake, the Gilded Man — El Dorado in Spanish — plunged into the water. When he emerged his golden load had gone. He stepped ashore, as the people hailed him as their new ruler.

This ceremony happened in the 15th century or before, and from it stems the whole fabulous story of El Dorado, the Gilded Man, who was later transformed in people’s imagination into a city of gold, and, finally, into a word meaning a dream country full of easy riches and happiness.

Read the rest of this article »

The gardener

Posted in Britain in the 60s on Thursday, 24 May 2007

The Gardener (illustration)

This is from the series ‘People You See’ which appeared in Teddy Bear magazine in the early 1960s.

Sadness

Posted in Absurd on Thursday, 24 May 2007

Sadness (illustration)

Daniel in the lions’ den

Posted in Bible on Wednesday, 23 May 2007

Daniel in the lions' den (illustration: James E McConnell)

This is one of the fabulous illustrations that appeared in The Bible Story, a short-lived companion publication to Look and Learn. The artist is James E McConnell.

Monstrous dream gives birth to Frankenstein

Posted in Literature, Technology on Wednesday, 23 May 2007

Mary Shelley's Frankestein (illustration)

On an evening in 1816, four people sat round the fireside in a house on the shores of Lake Geneva, in Switzerland, whiling away the time reading each other ghost stories. Two of the men, Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, were poets, the third a doctor named Polidori. The fourth and only woman in the party was Shelley’s 18-year-old wife, Mary.

It had not been an easy holiday for her, because she could hardly help feeling the “odd man out” in such company. Byron in particular was such an overpowering character that it took an outstanding personality to stand up to him, and quite often Mary would take a book and retreat to another part of the house, leaving the men to argue among themselves. But on this occasion they were all getting on well together, reading aloud from the novels of the supernatural that were so popular at the time. Then someone suggested that they should make up horror stories of their own.

Read the rest of this article »

The chiropadist

Posted in Britain in the 60s on Wednesday, 23 May 2007

Chiropadist (illustration)

This is from the series ‘People You See’ which appeared in Teddy Bear magazine in the early 1960s.