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Subject: ‘Dogs’

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The best pictures of Robinson Crusoe and his dog

Posted in Animals, Best pictures, Dogs, English Literature, Heroes and Heroines, Historical articles, History, Literature, Sea, Ships on Thursday, 1 October 2015

The best pictures of Robinson Crusoe’s pets are vivid images of him and the Captain’s dog, along with two cats, which also survive the shipwreck.
The first picture shows Crusoe and his dog.

Crusoe, picture, image, illustration

Robinson Crusoe and his dog

The second picture shows Crusoe out hunting.

Crusoe, picture, image, illustration

Robinson Crusoe out hunting with his dog

The third picture shows all Crusoe’s pets.

Crusoe, picture, image, illustration

Robinson Crusoe at home in the castle

Many more pictures of classic novels can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The best pictures of Launce and Crab

Posted in Actors, Best pictures, Dogs, English Literature, Historical articles, History, Shakespeare, Theatre on Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The best pictures of Launce and his “ungentlemanlike” dog, Crab, are striking images of the comic Shakespearean character and his pet.
The first picture shows Launce’s lecture.

Lance, picture, image, illustration

The Two Gentlemen of Verona Act IV, Scene IV by T F Dicksee

The second picture shows man and dog in comic mode.

Lance, picture, image, illustration

Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act IV, Scene IV by Felix Octavius Carr Darley

The third picture shows Launce and Speed with Crab.

Lance, picture, image, illustration

The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act II, Scene V by Henry Courtney Selous

Many more pictures of Shakespeare plays can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The best pictures of Elizabeth Barrett Browning and her spaniel, Flush

Posted in Actors, Animals, Best pictures, Cinema, Dogs, English Literature, Heroes and Heroines, Historical articles, History, London on Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The best pictures of Elizabeth Barrett and her spaniel named Flush are striking images of the invalid poet and her pet.
The first picture is a portrait.

Flush, picture, image, illustration

Elizabeth Barrett Browning and her cocker spaniel Flush by James E McConnell

The second picture shows Robert Browning meeting Elizabeth and her spaniel.

Flush, picture, image, illustration

The Poet, the Invalid and the Spaniel by C L Doughty

The third picture shows a cigarette-card still from the film The Barretts of Wimpole Street.

Flush, picture, image, illustration

Norma Shearer and 'Flush' in The Barretts of Wimpole Street

Many more pictures of poets can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The best pictures of Three Men in a Boat and Montmorency

Posted in Absurd, Animals, Best pictures, Boats, Dogs, English Literature, Historical articles, History, Rivers on Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The best pictures of Three Men in a Boat are vivid images of Jerome’s comic characters and their pet dog, Montmorency.
The first picture shows the chaotic trio and their dog.

J K Jerome, picture, image, illustration

Three Men in a Boat

The second picture shows the trio in conversation on the river.

J K Jerome, picture, image, illustration

Three Men in a Boat by Paul Rainer

The third picture shows the three in their tent with Montmorency.

J K Jerome, picture, image, illustration

Three Men in a Boat – Cheerful! by Tom Browne

Many more pictures of novels can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The best pictures of Bill Sikes and his dog named Bull’s Eye

Posted in Animals, Best pictures, Dogs, English Literature, Historical articles, History, London on Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The best pictures of Bill Sikes and his dog are vivid images of illustrations to Oliver Twist.
The first picture shows Sikes trying to get rid of Bull’s Eye.

Sikes, picture, image, illustration

Sikes attempting to destroy his dog by John Leech

The second picture shows a less familiar illustration by Frederick Barnard.

Sikes, picture, image, illustration

Bill Sikes by Frederick Barnard

The third picture shows Bull’s Eye watching Sikes attempting to make his escape.

Sikes, picture, image, illustration

The last chance by John Leech

Many more pictures of novels by Charles Dickens can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

The best pictures of regimental pets and mascots

Posted in Animals, Best pictures, Dogs, Historical articles, History, War on Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The best pictures of regimental pets and mascots are striking images of unusual subjects.
The first picture shows the regimental pet of the Royal Madras Fusiliers.

mascot, picture, image, illustration

The Regimental Pet of the Royal Madras Fusiliers by Samuel Carter

The second picture shows the regimental pet of the 57th Middlesex.

mascot, picture, image, illustration

"Tottie", a Regimental Pet by P Macquoid

The third picture shows the regimental pet of the Sappers and Miners.

mascot, picture, image, illustration

"Sandy," from the Crimea, the Dog of the Sappers and Miners

Many more pictures of pets can be found at the Look and Learn picture library.

Amundsen reached the South Pole on 14 December, 1911

Posted in Animals, Dogs, Exploration, Famous news stories, Historical articles, History on Wednesday, 26 February 2014

This edited article about Roald Amundsen first appeared in Look and Learn issue number 571 published on 23 December 1972.

Roald Amundsen,  picture, image, illustration

Roald Amundsen's journey to the South Pole with dogs by Luis Arcas Brauner

Roald Amundsen, the great Norwegian explorer, spent Christmas Day 1911 in the icy wasteland of the Antarctic. On December 14th at 3 o’clock in the afternoon he had become the first conqueror of the South Pole. Amundsen and his men unfolded the Norwegian flag. Five cold weatherbeaten hands gripped the flagpole as Amundsen proclaimed, “And so I plant you, our beloved flag, on the South Pole, and name the plateau on which it lies, King Haakon VII’s Plateau.”

There was no champagne, and they were cold, exhausted and worried about the long perilous journey home. That evening in their tent they celebrated by eating a small piece of seal meat in addition to their meagre rations.

The early 1900s are among the most dramatic and eventful in the history of Polar exploration. In 1905 Amundsen discovered the elusive North West Passage. It took him three years of hazardous adventures to find this maritime route through the Arctic regions from the Atlantic to the Pacific which navigators had been seeking for hundreds of years. Now the struggle to reach the North and South Poles was reaching a climax.

On 9th August 1910 Amundsen set sail from Norway in the Fram, apparently on his way to the North Pole. When he arrived at Madeira he released the sensational news that he was going to the Antarctic and would try to reach the South Pole. He now became a serious rival to Captain Robert Falcon Scott, the great British explorer, whose expedition was at that moment in an Australian harbour putting the final touches to preparations before setting out for the Antarctic. It now became a race between these two men to reach the South Pole.

Both explorers had had considerable experience in the Antarctic, but the British expedition seemed to have a great many advantages. Scott was returning to familiar ground in the McMurdo Sound, and full details of the route from here to within two degrees of the Pole were available. Amunsden based his expedition entirely on sleigh dogs. He believed it was essential to take a large quantity of provisions, and he planned to go by another route across vast tracts of unknown territory. Eminent polar explorers, among them Scott, considered it was impossible, because of the extreme cold, to reach the South Pole with a large team of dogs still alive. He intended travelling light and using skis for the final stages of his journey.

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The German dachshund became unpopular during the First World War

Posted in Animals, Dogs, Historical articles, World War 1 on Monday, 11 June 2012

This edited article about the dachshund originally appeared in Look and Learn issue number 723 published on 22 November 1975.

Victory Bonds poster, picture, image, illustration

A Canadian Officer drags off a German Officer and his pet dachshund in a poster for Victory Bonds produced during the First World War

A very popular breed both in Europe and America is the Dachshund, which means “badger dog” in German.

Six types are recognised in Britain; full-size and miniature smooth-haired, long-haired and wire-haired.

Most often seen is the smooth-haired variety. Developed in Germany, the Dachshund or Teckel as it is often called, is thought to have sprung from the Basset Hound.

There is also some question as to whether the Dachshund is essentially a terrier or a hound. His shape fits him for the part of an underground (or earth) worker – a terrier. But his fondness for tracking and good pack instinct put him firmly into the hound family. Perhaps he is a unique mixture of both.

First mentioned by name by a seventeenth century writer, the Dachshund did not arrive in Britain until the 1840s. Several were sent here by Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar as a present for fellow-countryman, Prince Albert (Queen Victoria’s husband). Kept in the spacious kennels of Windsor Castle, these dogs were used in pheasant shoots, working the covets in Windsor Forest.

This “new” breed aroused considerable interest, and, during the following ten years, more Dachshunds were imported from Germany. Between 1876 and 1877 no less than 200 dogs of this breed crossed the Channel to reach their new owners in this country.

The First World War in which Germany was the enemy, had a devastating effect upon the breed’s popularity in Britain. Incredible as it may seem, it was considered “terribly unpatriotic” to own “one of those fat, German sausage dogs” at that time, and Dachshunds all but disappeared in Britain.

Pet toy spaniels witnessed two famous Royal executions

Posted in Animals, Dogs, Historical articles, Royalty on Monday, 11 June 2012

This edited article about the toy spaniel originally appeared in Look and Learn issue number 723 published on 22 November, 1975.

King Charles spaniel, picture, image, illustration

Four cavaliers on the way to London find the dog that became the first King Charles Spaniel, by Gerritt Vandersyde

The only breed of dog named after a king is the King Charles Spaniel. Charles II had such an enormous amount of affection for these “toy” spaniels that his name was given to them.

Charles’ brother, who later became James II, also admired this breed, but when William and Mary gained the throne on the fall of the Stuarts, the spaniels were ousted in favour of Pugs.

“Toy” spaniels existed in Britain long before Stuart times and are thought to have originated on the Continent. It has been suggested that Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII’s fourth wife, may have brought some to this country on her marriage.

The unfortunate Mary, Queen of Scots, was beheaded in 1587 and, after the execution, a “toy” spaniel was found whimpering beneath her skirts.

In 1649, another royal execution took place, this time it was Charles I. He was accompanied by “Rogue”, his little spaniel, on the fearful walk to the block in Whitehall. Afterwards a Roundhead took the dog and put it on public exhibition for money.

Today there are two distinct types of these spaniels – the King Charles and the Cavalier King Charles. One very obvious difference is in the shape of their faces. Bulldog or Pug blood was thought to have been introduced into the breed late in the Victorian era. This produced the set-back, flattened nose of the present-day King Charles Spaniel.

Many people were sorry to see this change from the type which was depicted in so many paintings by Titian. Van Dyck and Watteau in earlier centuries. It took an American art-collector to put matters right. Due to his persistence, in 1926 a careful breeding programme was started which resulted in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel we know today, back again in the image of his earliest ancestors and without that unattractive, squashed nose.

The Cavalier, not surprisingly, is the more popular dog of the two. Slightly larger, he stands about 12 inches (304 mm) high, is often tan-and-pearly-white, with a long, slightly wavy, silky coat. His tail is carried low.

Faithful labradors make excellent guide-dogs for the blind

Posted in Animals, Dogs, Historical articles, Medicine on Monday, 11 June 2012

This edited article about the labrador originally appeared in Look and Learn issue number 723 published on 22 November 1975.

Guide-dog, picture, image, illustration

The female labrador is an excellent guide-dog

A “Jack-of-all-trades” in the canine world is the Labrador Retriever. Not only does he excel in his original job – retrieving – but he is a great guide dog for the blind. And he is the most successful dog used in peace and wartime for locating hidden explosives, firearms and dangerous drugs.

Labradors were not originally found in Labrador, as you might imagine, but further south in the Canadian province of Newfoundland. There, they were trained by fishermen to go into the sea around the rocky inlets and retrieve fish which had escaped from the nets.

They were known as the “smaller St. John’s dogs from Newfoundland” and were described in 1814 as “extremely quick in running and swimming, and their sense of smell is scarcely to be credited”.

Seamen brought them across the Atlantic to Britain when they landed at Poole harbour in Dorset with their cargoes of salted fish.

The Earl of Malmesbury started keeping and breeding these dogs in about 1835, calling them “Newfoundlands” He gave the name “Labrador” to one of a somewhat smaller type in 1878 and this name has been in use ever since.

As a gun dog, the Labrador is acknowledged to be unsurpassed. The retriever’s job is to seek out shot prey and bring it back safely to the hand of its master, its “soft” mouth barley touching the game.

From gun dog to guide dog for the blind was an easy, short step for the versatile Labradors. They have all the attributes needed for this important work – perhaps the greatest assistance any dog can give to man. Well endowed with initiative, extremely intelligent, steady and willing, they respond rapidly to training which, in this case, lasts for four months. Female dogs are always used, as they are less easily distracted than males.